Category: Fayetteville Street (page 2 of 5)

“Generation Rent” pushing demand for Downtown apartments

You’ve probably noticed the constructions sites that have sprung up everywhere you look in downtown, from Cameron Village to St Mary’s, to Hillsborough Street.  Having seen past booms that saturated the market with too much office space, too many spec homes and condos that sat empty, some are questioning the wisdom of developers who have jumped into the present apartment building craze.  Here is some perspective for the next time this comes up in a conversation with other downtowners…

This time is different!

Developers and the banks behind them are not taking risky bets this time.  Developers are focusing only on rental units, catering to ‘Generation Rent’.  And Raleigh is part of a national trend, as downtowns have begun growing faster than suburbs for the first time in 100 years!

Rents will not be cheap given downtown land prices, but unit sizes are smaller (lots of one bedrooms), and most important – no downpayment required!  After seeing the generation before them loose so much equity in their homes, renting appeals to young professionals who want more freedom and mobility.

Many of the apartment buildings underway (or planned) fall into the 5-6 story category, which keeps building cost per square foot down compared to taller buildings.  And they’re also mostly located on the periphery of downtown, where land prices are a bit more reasonable.

The one big exception is the recently announced Skyhouse Apartments, which is 23 stories and located in the heart of Downtown’s Raleigh’s business district.  It’s too soon to see if others will follow this lead and bring out more ambitious projects, but it’s worth noting that Charter Square  after some time is finally being actively leased.

Late last year this blog included a post on the planned apartment projects in or near downtown Raleigh.  So how are these projects coming along six months later?

Recently announced

 .
Started construction
.
Active – construction not yet started
.
No activity?

 

If you have any updated information on any of these projects or ones we may have missed, please let our readers know.

Raleigh Winterfest is Coming – Volunteer to help and skate free!

The Raleigh Winterfest returns to Downtown Raleigh on December 3rd, transforming City Plaza into a winter escape.  And while the ice skating rink serves as the centerpiece for Raleigh Winterfest, the two-month celebration also includes carriage rides, sledding ramps and performances by local musicians and dancers.

An estimated 15,000 people visited last year’s Winterfest, and it takes a lot of volunteers to make it work.  

Ready to volunteer and earn some free skate passes? Sign up on line 

Here’s the schedule and shifts …  

 

Raleigh Holiday Parade, Nov 19 

When: Saturday, November 19

Tasks: Handing out Winterfest flyers during the parade – meet at the DRA office (120 S. Wilmington St.)

Shifts: 9:30am-10:30am 

Setup Day, Dec 2 

Tasks: equipment and tent setup and stringing lights.

When: Friday, December 2 – meet at City Plaza

Shifts: 10am-12:30pm


Kickoff Day, Dec 3

Tasks: ticket taking, crowd control, sledding & carriage ride assistance and tent breakdown.

When: Saturday, December 3

Shifts: 4:00-6:30pm, 4:30-7:30pm, 7:30-10:30pm
 

Sledding Sundays

Tasks: Line control

When: Sundays (Dec 18, Jan 8, Jan 15)

Shifts: 11:00am-2:00pm and 2:00-4:30pm.

 

For more information contact erinheiderman@downtownraleigh.org.


28 Floors, 56 Flights, 1019 Steps, 1 Reason: Cure Cystic Fibrosis

 

Cystic Fibrosis Climb for Life

Where: Wachovia Capitol Center (now Wells Fargo)

  When: Saturday, October 29th

  Registration 9am / Climb Starts 10am

 

 

 

The Cystic Fibrosis Climb for Life event is challenging you … “to go beyond ordinary expectations, to take steps toward a personal victory and to play an important role in the victory of others”.  

Join the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and climb your way to the top of the Wachovia Capitol Center in downtown Raleigh. 

Once you reach the top, look out at the breathtaking panoramic view of downtown Raleigh.  Then, enjoy a celebration with food, drinks and entertainment at the survivor’s party.

For registration information or to volunteer at the event, please visit the CF Climb For LIfe website. Participants have a minimum fundraising requirement of $100, and must be registered for the Climb.

Climber Training Day

Wednesday, October 12th, from 4-6pm

Wachovia (Wells Fargo) Capitol Center

150 Fayetteville Street, Raleigh

Get some practice for the big day!  Get helpful tips on how to improve your time, training tips and connect with other climbers.  Parking is available in the Alexander Parking Deck.

 

Packet Pick-Up Day

Wednesday, October 26th, from 3-7pm

Fleet Feet Sports Raleigh

Ridgewood Shopping Center

3546 Wade Ave., Raleigh

 

About Cystic Fibrosis:

Cystic fibrosis is an inherited chronic disease that affects the lungs and digestive system of about 30,000 children and adults in the United States (70,000 worldwide).

In the 1950s, few children with cystic fibrosis lived to attend elementary school. Today, advances in research and medical treatments have further enhanced and extended life for children and adults with CF. Many people with the disease can now expect to live into their 30s, 40s and beyond.


Park(ing) Day: Friday, September 16th

Park(ing) Day is a worldwide event that encourages city residents to transform metered parking spaces into mini parks for the day to draw awareness to the need for more urban open space.

Raleigh’s Park(ing) day will be held as a part of SPARKcon, the Triangle’s creative festival, held in downtown Raleigh September 15-18.  
  

In support of the annual PARK(ing) DAY, greenSPARK is calling for designers to transform parking spaces along Fayetteville Street into mini-parks or “SPARKparks”.


 

The Downtown Living Advocates will transform two parking spaces along Fayetteville Street into urban open space during the festival.  Our theme will be education and awareness of the amount of land currently used as surface parking and how these surface lots can have multiple uses.  We will transform the spaces into a map of downtown indicating the land used as surface lots with bright colored paint.  The map will be an interactive small scaled version of downtown and be used to facilitate discussion about what amenities are needed downtown, (i.e. grocery store, movie theatre, multi-use play field, library, etc.)

If you are interested in volunteering for Park(ing) Day to help construct or participate during the festival weekend, please contact Kimberly Siran at streetscape@raleighdla.com.


New study provides evidence of Downtown Raleigh’s booming pedestrian traffic

The Downtown Raleigh Alliance (DRA) and the City of Raleigh Planning Department recently examined pedestrian traffic in key downtown areas.  The pedestrian study was conducted to support economic development programs and infrastructure planning initiatives in strategic areas.  The objective of the study was to develop a tool that downtown stakeholders and City officials could use to more accurately target growth areas and help resolve design issues with sidewalks, streetscapes, and pedestrian connectivity to on- and off-street parking locations.  It will also serve as a baseline pedestrian count data for future trend analyses. 

Fayetteville Street District

According to the report, a large pedestrian population uses and navigates the Downtown area.  The lunch period attracts the largest amount of pedestrian activity, as employees, visitors, and residents dine out in Downtown restaurants and cafes.  Fayetteville Street between Hargett and Davie streets is among the busiest areas, with the block between Hargett and Martin having the highest average of pedestrians per hour over the 11-hour count period.  The same block has the highest counts for the morning and lunch periods.

Nearly 18,000 pedestrians during weekday lunch hours

An overall comparison of all 11-hour count locations illustrates a clear increase in pedestrian traffic during the typical lunch hours of 11:30 am to 2 pm with a total of 17,912 pedestrians recorded in this time period, accounting for 41 percent of the total 11-hour count volume.  During the busiest stretch, more than 2,000 pedestrians traverse the area in just fifteen minutes, from 12:45 pm. to 1 pm.

Glenwood South

The pedestrian study also looked at the Glenwood South District and Warehouse District.  The two areas offer significant entertainment and nightlife options and cater to a late-night crowd with a mix of restaurants, bars, clubs, and other activities.  Both areas were examined over a period of six hours on the weekend from 8 pm to 2 am.

Over 17,000 pedestrians twelve hours later on weekends

Glenwood South recorded a total weekend evening and late night traffic of 17,400 pedestrians, with a spike in pedestrians from 11:30 pm to 2:00 am.  The block of Glenwood Avenue between Tucker and North streets had the highest level of pedestrian activity.

Warehouse District

The Warehouse District was also examined over a period of six hours during the evening, and recorded a total count of 2,654 pedestrians over the six hour period.  However, unlike Glenwood South, the Warehouse District experienced an overall decline in traffic from 11:30 pm to 2:00 am.

Analysis of the total volume of pedestrians in the Capital City’s center parallel to other cities evidenced the strength of activity on downtown Raleigh’s sidewalks.  The volume of traffic in the Raleigh study area tends to exceed the volume of small and even larger cities, including San Diego.  The findings and conclusion of the study illustrates a clear link between Downtown’s booming pedestrian environment and opportunities for commerce in the area. This supports efforts by the DRA and the City of Raleigh to encourage future public and private investments in the walkability, livability, and economic development of Downtown Raleigh.

The counts are part of a city-wide Pedestrian Plan that is expected to be competed in early 2012.

 

Information taken from Raleigh’s Weekly Newsgram, published July 29th.

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